PRODUCTS

Trauma Scene Cleanup Quick Reference Guide

 

OSHA training managers may use the guide to capture the employee/student's attention when teaching Bloodborne Pathogens 1910.1030, Confined Space 1910.146, Respiratory Protection 1910.134, Personal Protective Equipment 1910.132, and Hazard Communication 1910.1200 regardless of what industry they work in.

  

  • OSHA Standards Bloodborne Pathogens 1910.1030, Confined Space 1910.146, Respiratory Protection 1910.134, Personal Protective Equipment 1910.132, and Hazard Communication 1910.1200 are covered at the top of the 1st page next to an overview the Resource Conservation and Recovery act of 1976.  

  • In the case studies shown, you will be able to study the front lines of biological waste recovery and exotic contaminates, methamphetamine residue and tear gas remediation.

This Trauma Scene Cleanup Quick Reference Guide is comprised of a 3 mil laminated UV resistant plastic cover (3 2-sided pages, 6 total pages), with OSHA Standards Bloodborne Pathogens 1910.1030, Confined Space 1910.146, Respiratory Protection 1910.134, PPE 1910.132, and Haz Com 1910.1200 explained next to HD photo case studies and the associated training material slides for each of these OSHA standards.

The OSHA Standards applicable to these actions are on the 1st page of the Trauma Scene Cleanup Reference Guide including examples of projects responding to disease outbreaks in institutional facilities, disinfection of laboratory coolers, disinfection and demobilization of coroner decomposition coolers in high definition photos.  These high definition project photos show examples of personal protective equipment use in the projects and descriptions of the actions are in color-coded numbers on the photos for reference.

The Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Plan components of OSHA Standard 1910.1030 are detailed beside applicable sections Confined Space 1910.146, Respiratory Protection 1910.134, Personal Protective Equipment 1910.132, Hazard Communication 1910.1200. The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 is also outlined and explained next to the Types of Hazardous Substance Regulation shown next to the icons of the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for Classification and Labeling of Chemicals and Substances.

In the project examples, you will be able to study the front lines of crime scene clean up and biological waste recovery, methamphetamine residue and tear gas remediation, suicide cleanup, infection control, and hoarding cleanup.

OSHA Training For:

Corporate Safety Managers

Biohazard Remediation Managers

Construction Estimators and Managers

Insurance Claims Agents and Adjusters

Residential Property Managers

OSHA 1910.1030 - Exposure Control Plan

Any establishment that has operations that potentially could put an employee in contact with bloodborne pathogens must have a site exposure control plan (OSHA 1910.1030).  This plan is the fundamental approach to site health and safety and the 

strategy to get there.

 

The components of an exposure control plan are:

1    The policy and compliance plan (OSHA 1910.1030) to provide a safe work environment.

2    Supporting documentation (requirements, training)

3    Each employee’s job exposure expectation

4    Universal precautions  for all activities and training

5    Personal Protective Equipment is provided at no cost to employees

6    Housekeeping requirements for storage of regulated medical waste, conventional waste

7    Employee vaccinations

 

Each individual site, hospital, and/or kiosk has its own local rules and regulations and the site exposure control plan serves as a part of this support. 

OSHA 1910.1200- Hazard Communication

OSHA 1910.1200 Hazard Communication standard communicates the importance of the right information in the right hands.  

 

For each chemical that is used in the workplace, a MSDS must be on file for easy access.  This Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) is provided should there be a fire, and/or if a dangerous fume is present during use.  Mixing precautions by the producer of the substance is provided along with  safety information and any other 

substance-specific information to support safe use.  

 

All of the MSDSs of the chemicals used by the facility or on a job site must be stored with the site exposure control plan in a right-to-know binder or central location for quick access.  Copies of the MSDS forms should be in a file cabinet for easy inspection or should there be a need for the information on site where the chemicals are stored.  Collating your MSDS information, training records, company specific policies and procedures, and any state mandated license material in a binder for the response vehicle is vital.  

 

It is very important to have easy access to this information when questioned for it.  And, if you know someone is going to ask for it when you arrive on site, print copies for the OSHA rep and/or anyone else who may need it.

Safety Managers

Safety Managers can use the compliance support and internal training for supervisors on OSHA regulations with project examples that hold attention when explaining task safety. Sustainable safe task planning can benefit with clear examples of risk manifesting in the form of blood related projects.  When faced with the potential of underestimating a risk by not visualizing a very poor outcome, safety managers can clearly explain to operational supervisors to review for potential unsafe practices in their plans.

 

Trauma Scene Cleanup Reference Guides can assist in developing task plans for the cleaning of suicides and decompositions in Confined Spaces or the refined Respiratory Protection (OSHA 1910.134) needed for exotic contaminates such as methamphetamine residue and tear gas in affected structures included in the scope of work.  Each step of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA.gov) Voluntary Guidelines for Methamphetamine Laboratory Cleanup is documented and an example is shown with a HD photo of the task performance.